Activity: Electrostatic Potential Due to a Pair of Charges (with Series)

Static Fields 2022 (4 years)
Students work in small groups to use the superposition principle \[V(\vec{r}) = \frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\sum_i \frac{q_i}{\vert\vec{r}-\vec{r}_i\vert}\] to find the electrostatic potential \(V\) everywhere in space due to a pair of charges (either identical charges or a dipole). Different groups are assigned different arrangements of charges and different regions of space to consider: either on the axis of the charges or in the plane equidistant from the two charges, for either small or large values of the relevant geometric variable. Each group is asked to find a power series expansion for the electrostatic potential, valid in their group's assigned region of space. The whole class wrap-up discussion then compares and contrasts the results and discuss the symmetries of the two cases.
What students learn
  • The superposition principle for the electrostatic potential;
  • How to calculate the distance formula \(\frac{1}{|\vec{r} - \vec{r}'|}\) for a simple specific geometric situation;
  • How to calculate the first few terms of a (binomial) power series expansion by factoring out the dimensionful quantity which is large;
  • How the symmetries of a physical situation are reflected in the symmetries of the power series expansion.
  • group Electrostatic Potential Due to a Pair of Charges (without Series)

    group Small Group Activity

    30 min.

    Electrostatic Potential Due to a Pair of Charges (without Series)
    Static Fields 2022 (3 years) Students work in small groups to use the superposition principle \[V(\vec{r}) = \frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\sum_i \frac{q_i}{\vert\vec{r}-\vec{r}_i\vert}\] to find the electrostatic potential \(V\) everywhere in space due to a pair of charges (either identical charges or a dipole). This activity can be paired with activity 29 to find the limiting cases of the potential on the axes of symmetry.
  • group Electrostatic Potential Due to a Ring of Charge

    group Small Group Activity

    30 min.

    Electrostatic Potential Due to a Ring of Charge
    Static Fields 2022 (6 years)

    electrostatic potential charge linear charge density taylor series power series scalar field superposition symmetry distance formula

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Ring Cycle Sequence

    Students work in groups of three to use the superposition principle \[V(\vec{r}) =\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\int\frac{\rho(\vec{r}^{\,\prime})}{\vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}^{\,\prime}\vert} \, d\tau^{\prime}\] to find an integral expression for the electrostatic potential, \(V(\vec{r})\), everywhere in space, due to a ring of charge.

    In an optional extension, students find a series expansion for \(V(\vec{r})\) either on the axis or in the plane of the ring, for either small or large values of the relevant geometric variable. Add an extra half hour or more to the time estimate for the optional extension.

  • format_list_numbered Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    format_list_numbered Sequence

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    The first three activities provide an active-engagement version of the canonical mathematical and geometric fundamentals for power series. The subsequent activities apply these ideas to physical situations that are appropriate for an upper-division electromagnetism course, using concepts, terminology, and techniques that are common among physicists, but not often taught in mathematics courses. In particular students use the memorized formula for the binomial expansion to evaluate various electrostatic and magnetostatic field in regions of high symmetry. By factoring out a physical quantity which is large compared to another physical quantity, they manipulate the formulas for these fields into a form where memorized formulas apply. The results for the different regions of high symmetry are compared and contrasted. A few homework problems that emphasize the meaning of series notation are included.

    Note: The first two activities are also included in Power Series Sequence (Mechanics) and can be skipped in E&M if already taught in Mechanics.

  • assignment Linear Quadrupole (w/ series)

    assignment Homework

    Linear Quadrupole (w/ series)

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Static Fields 2022 (4 years)

    Consider a collection of three charges arranged in a line along the \(z\)-axis: charges \(+Q\) at \(z=\pm D\) and charge \(-2Q\) at \(z=0\).

    1. Find the electrostatic potential at a point \(\vec{r}\) in the \(xy\)-plane at a distance \(s\) from the center of the quadrupole. The formula for the electrostatic potential \(V\) at a point \(\vec{r}\) due to a charge \(Q\) at the point \(\vec{r'}\) is given by: \[ V(\vec{r})=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0} \frac{Q}{\vert \vec{r}-\vec{r'}\vert} \] Electrostatic potentials satisfy the superposition principle.
    2. Assume \(s\gg D\). Find the first two non-zero terms of a power series expansion to the electrostatic potential you found in the first part of this problem.

  • group Electric Field Due to a Ring of Charge

    group Small Group Activity

    30 min.

    Electric Field Due to a Ring of Charge
    Static Fields 2022 (6 years)

    coulomb's law electric field charge ring symmetry integral power series superposition

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Ring Cycle Sequence

    Students work in groups of three to use Coulomb's Law \[\vec{E}(\vec{r}) =\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\int\frac{\rho(\vec{r}^{\,\prime})\left(\vec{r}-\vec{r}^{\,\prime}\right)}{\vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}^{\,\prime}\vert^3} \, d\tau^{\prime}\] to find an integral expression for the electric field, \(\vec{E}(\vec{r})\), everywhere in space, due to a ring of charge.

    In an optional extension, students find a series expansion for \(\vec{E}(\vec{r})\) either on the axis or in the plane of the ring, for either small or large values of the relevant geometric variable. Add an extra half hour or more to the time estimate for the optional extension.

  • group Calculating Coefficients for a Power Series

    group Small Group Activity

    30 min.

    Calculating Coefficients for a Power Series
    Static Fields 2022 (5 years)

    Taylor series power series approximation

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    This activity starts with a brief lecture introduction to power series and a short derivation of the formula for calculating the coefficients of a power series for a particular function:

    \[c_n={1\over n!}\, f^{(n)}(z_0)\]

    After a brief lecture deriving the formula for the coefficients of a power series, students compute the power series coefficients for a \(\sin\theta\) (around both the origin and \(\frac{\pi}{6}\)). The meaning of these coefficients and the convergence behavior for each approximation is discussed in the whole-class wrap-up.

  • assignment Series Convergence

    assignment Homework

    Series Convergence

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Static Fields 2022 (4 years)

    Recall that, if you take an infinite number of terms, the series for \(\sin z\) and the function itself \(f(z)=\sin z\) are equivalent representations of the same thing for all real numbers \(z\), (in fact, for all complex numbers \(z\)). This is not always true. More commonly, a series is only a valid, equivalent representation of a function for some more restricted values of \(z\). The technical name for this idea is convergence--the series only "converges" to the value of the function on some restricted domain, called the “interval” or “region of convergence.”

    Find the power series for the function \(f(z)=\frac{1}{1+z^2}\). Then, using the Mathematica worksheet from class (vfpowerapprox.nb) as a model, or some other computer algebra system like Sage or Maple, explore the convergence of this series. Where does your series for this new function converge? Can you tell anything about the region of convergence from the graphs of the various approximations? Print out a plot and write a brief description (a sentence or two) of the region of convergence. You may need to include a lot of terms to see the effect of the region of convergence. Keep adding terms until you see a really strong effect!

    Note: As a matter of professional ettiquette (or in some cases, as a legal copyright requirement), if you use or modify a computer program written by someone else, you should always acknowledge that fact briefly in whatever you write up. Say something like: “This calculation was based on a (name of software package) program titled (title) originally written by (author) copyright (copyright date).”

  • computer Approximating Functions with Power Series

    computer Computer Simulation

    30 min.

    Approximating Functions with Power Series
    Static Fields 2022 (7 years)

    Taylor series power series approximation

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Students use prepared Sage code or a prepared Mathematica notebook to plot \(\sin\theta\) simultaneously with several terms of a power series expansion to judge how well the approximation fits. Students can alter the worksheet to change the number of terms in the expansion and even to change the function that is being considered. Students should have already calculated the coefficients for the power series expansion in a previous activity, Calculating Coefficients for a Power Series.
  • group Magnetic Field Due to a Spinning Ring of Charge

    group Small Group Activity

    30 min.

    Magnetic Field Due to a Spinning Ring of Charge
    Static Fields 2022 (5 years)

    magnetic fields current Biot-Savart law vector field symmetry

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Ring Cycle Sequence

    Students work in groups of three to use the Biot-Savart law \[\vec{B}(\vec{r}) =\frac{\mu_0}{4\pi}\int\frac{\vec{J}(\vec{r}^{\,\prime})\times \left(\vec{r}-\vec{r}^{\,\prime}\right)}{\vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}^{\,\prime}\vert^3} \, d\tau^{\prime}\] to find an integral expression for the magnetic field, \(\vec{B}(\vec{r})\), due to a spinning ring of charge.

    In an optional extension, students find a series expansion for \(\vec{B}(\vec{r})\) either on the axis or in the plane of the ring, for either small or large values of the relevant geometric variable. Add an extra half hour or more to the time estimate for the optional extension.

  • group Magnetic Vector Potential Due to a Spinning Charged Ring

    group Small Group Activity

    30 min.

    Magnetic Vector Potential Due to a Spinning Charged Ring
    Static Fields 2022 (4 years)

    compare and contrast mathematica magnetic vector potential magnetic fields vector field symmetry

    Power Series Sequence (E&M)

    Ring Cycle Sequence

    Students work in groups of three to use the superposition principle \[\vec{A}(\vec{r}) =\frac{\mu_0}{4\pi}\int\frac{\vec{J}(\vec{r}^{\,\prime})}{\vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}^{\,\prime}\vert}\, d\tau^{\prime}\] to find an integral expression for the magnetic vector potential, \(\vec{A}(\vec{r})\), due to a spinning ring of charge.

    In an optional extension, students find a series expansion for \(\vec{A}(\vec{r})\) either on the axis or in the plane of the ring, for either small or large values of the relevant geometric variable. Add an extra half hour or more to the time estimate for the optional extension.

Electrostatic Potential from Two Charges

Find a third order approximation to the electrostatic potential \(V(\vec{r})\) for one of the following physical situations.

  1. Two charges \(+Q\) and \(+Q\) are placed on a line at \(z'=D\) and \(z''=-D\) respectively.
    1. On the \(x\)-axis for \(|x| \ll D\)?
    2. On the \(z\)-axis for \(|z| \ll D\)?
    3. On the \(x\)-axis for \(|x| \gg D\)?
    4. On the \(z\)-axis for \(|z| \gg D\)?
  2. Two charges \(+Q\) and \(-Q\) are placed on a line at \(z'=+D\) and \(z''=-D\) respectively.
    1. On the \(x\)-axis for \(|x| \ll D\)?
    2. On the \(z\)-axis for \(|z| \ll D\)?
    3. On the \(x\)-axis for \(|x| \gg D\)?
    4. On the \(z\)-axis for and \(|z| \gg D\)?

Work out your problem by brainstorming together on a big whiteboard and also answer the following questions:

  • For what values of \(\vec{r}\) does your series converge?
  • For what values of \(\vec{r}\) is your approximation a good one?
  • Which direction would a test charge move under the influence of this electric potential?

If your group gets done early, go on to another problem. The fourth problem in each set is the most challenging, and the most interesting.

Instructor's Guide

Introduction

Students typically know the iconic formula for the electrostatic potential of a point charge \(V=\frac{kq}{r}\). We begin this activity with a short lecture/discussion that generalizes this formula in a coordinate independent way to the situation where the source is moved away from the origin to the point \(\vec{r}{}^{\prime}\), \(V(\vec{r})=\frac{kq}{|\vec{r} - \vec{r}{}^{\prime}|}\). (A nice warm-up (SWBQ) to lead off the discussion:

Introductory SWBQ Prompt: “Write down the electrostatic potential everywhere in space due to a point charge that is not at the origin.” The lecture should also review the superposition principle. \[ V(\vec{r})=\sum_{i}\frac{kq_i}{|\vec{r} - \vec{r_i}|} \]

This general, coordinate-independent formula should be left on the board for students to consult as they do this activity.

Student Conversations

  • Note: two of the eight cases on the worksheet are trivial (the potential on the \(y\)-axis is zero for the \(+Q\) and \(-Q\) situation). Once these groups have established the correct answer and can justify it, they should be directed to work on one of the other six questions.
  • In the first part of this activity, students will create an expression such as \(V(x,y,z) = \frac{Q}{ 4\pi\epsilon_0} {\left(\frac{1}{|D - z|} + \frac{1}{|D + z|}\right)}\); each situation has a slightly different formula. A few groups may have trouble coordinatizing \(|\vec{r} - \vec{r}^{\prime}|\) into an expression in rectangular coordinates, but because the coordinate system is set up for them, most students are successful with this part fairly quickly.
  • In the second part of the activity, students are asked to take the equation above and develop a 4th order power series expansion. About 20 minutes will be needed for this portion of the activity. Almost all students will struggle with creating the power series. Although our students have some experience with power series from mathematics courses, they are unlikely to have seen the common physics strategy of substituting into known series by rewriting into an expression in terms of dimensionless parameters and then using a known power series. The groups may need lots of guidance to find this strategy.
  • If students have been exposed to Taylor's theorem \(f(z) = f(a) + f^{\prime}(a)(z-a) + f^{\prime\prime}(a){{(z-a)^2}\over {2!}} + \), they will probably first attempt to apply this basic formula to this situation. Successive derivatives will rapidly lead to an algebraic mess. In general, we let students "get stuck" at this stage for only a few minutes before suggesting that they try a known power series expansion. We don't tell them which one, but they rapidly rule out formulas for trigonometric functions and other functions that clearly don't apply.
  • Once students are aware that \((1 + z)^p = 1 + pz + \frac{p(p-1)}{2!}{z^2} + ...\) is the expansion they need to be using, they still face a substantial challenge. It may not be immediately obvious to them how an expression such as \(1\over {|z-D|}\) can be transformed to the form \((1 + z)^p\). Simply giving students the answer at this point will defeat most of the learning possibilities of this activity. Students may need some time just to recognize that \(p = -1\); they may need much more time to determine if \(z\) or \(D\) is the smaller quantity and recognize that by factoring out the larger quantity they can have an expression that starts looking like \((1 + z)^p\), with \(z = \frac{x}{D}\) (or \(\frac{D}{x}\) or) and \(p = -1\).
  • MANY students make algebraic errors such as incorrectly factoring out \(D\) or \(x\). These should be brought to their attention quickly. Students may also have trouble dealing with negative exponents or with the absolute value sign.
  • Students who are having trouble figuring out what parameter to expand in can be asked what quantity is small. Then they can be asked what that means --- small with respect to what? This should eventually guide them to a ratio --- which is small with respect to \(1\), as required.
  • Many students are likely to treat this as a two-dimensional case from the start, ignoring the \(z\) axis entirely. Look for expressions like \[V = \frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0} \sum_{i=1}^N {q_i\over\sqrt{(x - x_i)^2 + (z - z_i)^2}}. \] Encourage them to think in three dimensions.
  • Point out that one should NEVER expand a series in the denominator. Use a negative exponent instead. It can be surprising how many upper-division physics students still have foundational problems with negative exponents.
  • Laurent Series For the cases that point where the potential is being evaluated is far from the source, the series that the students will find is technically a Laurent series, not a power series (the series involves INVERSE powers of the position of the detector). Nevertheless, they will be using a power series formula where the expansion parameter \[\frac{\hbox{distance from the origin to the source}}{\hbox{distance from the origin to the detector}}\] is small, so their formula is valid. It is not necessary to make a big deal out of the difference between power and Laurent series, but savvy students may have questions.
  • Some students may wonder why we care about the power series expansion of an expression we have in closed form? Answer: Because in applications we won't know the closed form.

Wrap-up

If time allows, each of the eight groups should have an opportunity to present their results to the class. The instructor should encourage students to compare and contrast the results for the eight situations. This should include careful attention to:

  • whether the situation is symmetric or anti-symmetric and how this relates to whether the power series is odd or even;
  • whether the terms of the series get successively smaller
  • whether the answers “make sense” given the physical situation and what they tell you about how the field changes along the given axis.

End with a discussion that extracts from the different examples the overall method:

  • Start with the iconic equation;
  • Use what you know about the coordinate system and positions of objects to coordinatize \(|\vec{r} - \vec{r}^{\prime} |\)
  • Factor out the parameter that is large and use a memorized series for \((1+z)^p\),


Author Information
Corinne Manogue, Kerry Browne
Keywords
electrostatic potential multipole charge symmetry scalar field superposition coulomb's Law
Learning Outcomes