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Activities

Small Group Activity

30 min.

Travelling wave solution
Students work in a small group to write down an equation for a travelling wave.

Small Group Activity

30 min.

Earthquake waves
In this activity students use the known speed of earthquake waves to estimate the Young's modulus of the Earth's crust.

Computational Activity

120 min.

Sinusoidal basis set
Students compute inner products to expand a wave function in a sinusoidal basis set. This activity introduces the inner product for wave functions, and the idea of approximating a wave function using a finite set of basis functions.

Computational Activity

120 min.

Mean position
Students compute probabilities and averages given a probability density in one dimension. This activity serves as a soft introduction to the particle in a box, introducing all the concepts that are needed.

Small Group Activity

5 min.

Fourier Transform of a Plane Wave

Find the Fourier transform of a plane wave.

Instructor's Guide

Introduction

If students know about the Dirac delta function and its exponential representation, this is a great second example of the Fourier transform that students can work out in-class for themselves.

Students will need a short lecture giving the definition of the Fourier Transform \begin{equation} {\cal{F}}(f) =\tilde{f} (k)= \frac{1}{\sqrt{2\pi}} \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} e^{-ikx}\, f(x)\, dx \end{equation}

Student Conversations

Students may ask what is meant by a plane wave. Help them figure out what is meant, from the context or give them the formula if time is tight.

Keep the time dependence in or leave it out depending on how much time you have to deal with a little extra algebraic confusion.

Wrap-up

This example is (almost) the inverse of Fourier Transform of the Delta Function. If you really want the inverse problem, change the prompt to “Find the inverse Fourier transform of a plane wave.”
  • Found in: Periodic Systems course(s) Found in: Fourier Transforms and Wave Packets sequence(s)
Using either this Geogebra applet or this Mathematica notebook, explore the wave functions on a ring. (Note: The Geogebra applet may be a little easier to use and understand and is accessible if you don't have access to Mathematica, but it is more limited in the wave functions that you can represent. Also, the animation is pretty jumpy in some browsers, especially Firefox. Imagine that the motion is smooth.)
  1. Look at graphs of the following states \begin{align} \Phi_1(\phi)&=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\left|{2}\right\rangle +\left|{-2}\right\rangle )\\ \Phi_2(\phi)&=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\left|{2}\right\rangle -\left|{-2}\right\rangle )\\ \Phi_3(\phi)&=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\left|{2}\right\rangle +i\left|{-2}\right\rangle ) \end{align} Write a short description of how these states differ from each other.
  2. Find a state for which the probability density does not depend on time. Write the state in both ket and wave function notation. These are called stationary states. Generalize your result to give a characterization of the set of all possible states that are stationary states.
  3. Find a state that is right-moving. Write the state in both ket and wave function notation. Generalize your result to give a characterization of the set of all possible states that are right-moving.
  4. Find a state that is a standing wave. Write the state in both ket and wave function notation. Generalize your result to give a characterization of the set of all possible states that are standing waves.
  • Found in: Central Forces course(s)

Give the general solution of the differential equation: \[\frac{d^2 u}{d\phi^2}+u=0\]

It is NOT necessary to show any work.

  • Found in: Central Forces course(s)

Give the general solution of the differential equation: \[\frac{d^2 \Phi}{d\phi^2}+7\Phi=0\]

It is NOT necessary to show any work.

  • Found in: Central Forces course(s)

Give the general solution of the differential equation: \[\frac{d^2 y}{dx^2}+Ay=0\] Make sure that you can give the solution of this equation regardless of the geometric names of the dependent and independent variables and for either sign for the constant \(A\).

It is NOT necessary to show any work. You may NOT, however, give a solution that has a negative number inside a square root. I am testing whether you can recognize this equation and remember its solution. This equation comes up over and over again in physics, but disguised by different symbols. I am also testing whether you recognize that the geometric character of the equation changes depending on the sign of \(A\).

  • Found in: Central Forces course(s)
Consider a phase transformation between either solid or liquid and gas. Assume that the volume of the gas is way bigger than that of the liquid or solid, such that \(\Delta V \approx V_g\). Furthermore, assume that the ideal gas law applies to the gas phase. Note: this problem is solved in the textbook, in the section on the Clausius-Clapeyron equation.
  1. Solve for \(\frac{dp}{dT}\) in terms of the pressure of the vapor and the latent heat \(L\) and the temperature.

  2. Assume further that the latent heat is roughly independent of temperature. Integrate to find the vapor pressure itself as a function of temperature (and of course, the latent heat).

You are given the following Gibbs free energy: \begin{equation*} G=-k T N \ln \left(\frac{a T^{5 / 2}}{p}\right) \end{equation*} where \(a\) is a constant (whose dimensions make the argument of the logarithm dimensionless).

  1. Compute the entropy.

  2. Work out the heat capacity at constant pressure \(C_p\).

  3. Find the connection among \(V\), \(p\), \(N\), and \(T\), which is called the equation of state (Hint: find the volume as a partial derivative of the Gibbs free energy).

  4. Compute the internal energy \(U\).

Small Group Activity

5 min.

Static Fields Equation Sheet

Gauss's Law: \[ \oint \vec{E}\cdot \hat{n}\, dA = {1\over\epsilon_0}\, Q_{\hbox{enc}} \]

Ampère's Law:

\[ \oint \vec{B}\cdot d\vec{r} = \mu_0 \, I_{\hbox{enc}} \]

Potentials: \begin{eqnarray*} \vec{E}&=&-\vec{\nabla} V\\ \vec{B}&=&\vec{\nabla}\times\vec{A} \end{eqnarray*}


Maxwell's Equations: \begin{eqnarray*} \vec{\nabla}\cdot\vec{E} &=& \frac{\rho}{\epsilon_0}\\ \vec{\nabla}\cdot\vec{B} &=& 0\\ \vec{\nabla}\times\vec{E} &=& 0\\ \vec{\nabla}\times\vec{B} &=& {\mu_0}\, \vec{J} \end{eqnarray*}


Superposition Laws: \begin{eqnarray*} V(\vec{r}) &=& \frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0} \int{\rho(\vec{r}')\, d\tau'\over \vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}'\vert}\\ \vec{E}(\vec{r}) &=& \frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0} \int{\rho(\vec{r}')(\vec{r}-\vec{r}')\, d\tau'\over \vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}'\vert^3}\\ \vec{A}(\vec{r}) &=& \frac{\mu_0}{4\pi} \int{\vec{J}(\vec{r}')\, d\tau'\over \vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}'\vert}\\ \vec{B}(\vec{r}) &=& \frac{\mu_0}{4\pi} \int{\vec{J}(\vec{r}')\times (\vec{r}-\vec{r}')\, d\tau'\over \vert \vec{r}-\vec{r}'\vert^3}\\ V(B)-V(A)&=&-\int_A^B \vec{E}\cdot d\vec{r} \end{eqnarray*}



Position Vectors \begin{align*} \vec{r} &= x \hat{x} + y\hat{y} + z\hat{z}\\ &= s \hat{s} + z\hat{z}\\ &= r\hat{r} \end{align*}

The distance between two position vectors

  1. In cylindrical coordinates: \[\left\vert\vec r -\vec r^{\prime}\right\vert =\sqrt{s^2+s^{\prime\, 2}-2s\, s^{\prime}\cos(\phi- \phi^{\prime}) +(z-z^{\prime})^2}\]
  2. In spherical coordinates: \[\left\vert\vec r -\vec r^{\prime}\right\vert =\sqrt{r^2+r^{\prime\, 2}-2r\, r^{\prime}\left[ \sin\theta\sin\theta^{\prime}\cos(\phi-\phi^{\prime}) +\cos\theta\cos\theta^{\prime}\right]}\]

Rectangular Coordinates: \begin{eqnarray*} \vec{\nabla} f &=& \frac{\partial f}{\partial x}\,\hat{x} + \frac{\partial f}{\partial y}\,\hat{y} + \frac{\partial f}{\partial z}\,\hat{z} \\ \vec{\nabla}\cdot\vec{F} &=& \frac{\partial F_x}{\partial x} + \frac{\partial F_y}{\partial y} + \frac{\partial F_z}{\partial z} \\ \vec{\nabla}\times\vec{F} &=& \left(\frac{\partial F_z}{\partial y}-\frac{\partial F_y}{\partial z}\right)\hat{x} + \left(\frac{\partial F_x}{\partial z} -\frac{\partial F_z}{\partial x}\right)\hat{y} + \left(\frac{\partial F_y}{\partial x} -\frac{\partial F_x}{\partial y}\right)\hat{z} \end{eqnarray*}


Cylindrical Coordinates: \begin{eqnarray*} \vec{\nabla} f &=& \frac{\partial f}{\partial s}\,\hat{s} + \frac{1}{s}\frac{\partial f}{\partial \phi}\,\hat{\phi} + \frac{\partial f}{\partial z}\,\hat{z} \\ \vec{\nabla}\cdot\vec{F} &=& \frac{1}{s}\frac{\partial}{\partial s}\left({s}F_{s}\right) + \frac{1}{s}\frac{\partial F_\phi}{\partial \phi} + \frac{\partial F_z}{\partial z} \\ \vec{\nabla}\times\vec{F} &=& \left( \frac{1}{s}\frac{\partial F_z}{\partial \phi} - \frac{\partial F_\phi}{\partial z} \right) \hat{s} + \left(\frac{\partial F_s}{\partial z}-\frac{\partial F_z}{\partial s}\right) \hat{\phi} + \frac{1}{s} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial s}\left({s}F_{\phi}\right) - \frac{\partial F_s}{\partial \phi} \right) \hat{z} \end{eqnarray*}


Spherical Coordinates: \begin{eqnarray*} \vec{\nabla} f &=& \frac{\partial f}{\partial r}\,\hat{r} + \frac{1}{r}\frac{\partial f}{\partial \theta}\,\hat{\theta} + \frac{1}{r\sin\theta}\frac{\partial f}{\partial \phi}\,\hat{\phi} \\ \vec{\nabla}\cdot\vec{F} &=& \frac{1}{r^2}\frac{\partial}{\partial r}\left({r^2}F_{r}\right) + \frac{1}{r\sin\theta}\frac{\partial}{\partial \theta}\left({\sin\theta}F_{\theta}\right) + \frac{1}{r\sin\theta}\frac{\partial F_\phi}{\partial \phi} \\ \vec{\nabla}\times\vec{F} &=& \frac{1}{r\sin\theta} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial \theta} \left({\sin\theta}F_{\phi}\right) - \frac{\partial F_\theta}{\partial \phi} \right) \hat{r} + \frac{1}{r} \left( \frac{1}{\sin\theta} \frac{\partial F_r}{\partial \phi} - \frac{\partial}{\partial r}\left({r}F_{\phi}\right) \right) \hat{\theta} \\ && \quad + \frac{1}{r} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial r}\left({r}F_{\theta}\right) - \frac{\partial F_r}{\partial \theta} \right) \hat{\phi} \end{eqnarray*}


Lorentz Force Law:

\[\vec{F}=q_{\hbox{test}}\left(\vec{E}+\vec{v}\times\vec{B}\right)\]


Step and Delta Functions: \begin{eqnarray*} \frac{d}{dx} \theta(x-a)&=&\delta(x-a)\\ \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} f(x)\delta(x-a)\, dx&=&f(a) \end{eqnarray*}


Vector Calculus Theorems: \begin{eqnarray*} \oint \vec{F} \cdot d\vec{A} &=& \int \vec{\nabla} \cdot \vec{F} d\tau\\ \oint \vec{F} \cdot d\vec{\ell} &=& \int (\vec{\nabla} \times \vec{F}) \cdot d\vec{A}\\ \end{eqnarray*}


Total Charge and Current: \begin{eqnarray*} Q &=& \int \rho (\vec{r}') d\tau'\\ I &=& \int \vec{J} (\vec{r}') \cdot d\vec{A'}\\ \end{eqnarray*}

  • Found in: Static Fields course(s)
The instructor gives a brief lecture about time dependence of energy eigenstates (e.g. McIntyre, 3.1). Notes for the students are attached.

Lecture

30 min.

Review of Thermal Physics
These are notes, essentially the equation sheet, from the final review session for https://paradigms.oregonstate.edu/courses/ph441.

Small Group Activity

30 min.

Black space capsule
In this activity, students apply the Stefan-Boltzmann equation and the principle of energy balance in steady state to find the steady state temperature of a black object in near-Earth orbit.
This handout lists Motivating Questions, Key Activities/Problems, Unit Learning Outcomes, and an Equation Sheet for a Unit on Classical Mechanics Orbits. It can be used both to introduce the unit and, even better, for review.
  • Found in: Central Forces course(s)

Small Group Activity

120 min.

Projectile with Linear Drag
Students consider projectile motion of an object that experiences drag force that in linear with the velocity. Students consider the horizontal motion and the vertical motion separately. Students solve Newton's 2nd law as a differential equation.

Small Group Activity

30 min.

Wavefunctions on a Quantum Ring
This activity lets students explore translating a wavefunction that isn't obviously made up of eigenstates at first glance into ket and matrix form. Then students explore wave functions, probabilities in a region, expectation values, and what wavefunctions can tell you about measurements of \(L_z\).
Students calculate probabilities for a particle on a ring using three different notations: Dirac bra-ket, matrix, and wave function. After calculating the angular momentum and energy measurement probabilities, students compare their calculation methods for notation.

Small Group Activity

10 min.

Gaussian Parameters
Students use an applet to explore the role of the parameters \(N\), \(x_o\), and \(\sigma\) in the shape of a Gaussian \begin{equation} f(x)=Ne^{-\frac{(x-x_0)^2}{2\sigma^2}} \end{equation}
  • Found in: Periodic Systems course(s) Found in: Fourier Transforms and Wave Packets sequence(s)